Albuquerque
 Albuquerque
Atlanta
 Atlanta
Austin
 Austin
Boston
 Boston
Buick
 Buick
Charleston
 Charleston
Chicago
 Chicago
Dallas
 Dallas
Denver
 Denver
Detroit
 Detroit
Kansas City, MO
 Kansas City, MO
Los Angeles
 Los Angeles
Memphis
 Memphis
Miami
 Miami
Minneapolis
 Minneapolis
Napa
 Napa
New Orleans
 New Orleans
New York
 New York
Oakland
 Oakland
Philadelphia
 Philadelphia
Phoenix
 Phoenix
Pittsburgh
 Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
 Portland, ME
Portland, OR
 Portland, OR
Raleigh-Durham
 Raleigh-Durham
San Diego
 San Diego
San Francisco
 San Francisco
Seattle
 Seattle
Washington, D.C.
 Washington, D.C.
New York

New York

There's nothing you can't do.

Off to the Races

Off to the Races

Leaving Manhattan, Long Island to Sea Cliff.

Bocce Ballin'

Bocce Ballin'

Fun and food, Brooklyn to the Bronx.

Up the River

Up the River

Off the grid, New Paltz to Rhinebeck.

Upstate Utopia

Upstate Utopia

Vintage flavor in Rhinebeck and Phoenicia.

New York City

New York City

Think you know New York? Think again.

Roundtable

Roundtable

One word: Pulse.

Cream of the Crop

Cream of the Crop

Meet the Urban Milkman.

Kimchi Connection

Kimchi Connection

Flavorful inspiration.

Big City Ballet

Big City Ballet

A dancer's guide to Brooklyn.

Fare Game

Fare Game

Through the eyes of a cabbie.

Roundtable

Roundtable

Hidden gems from New York's ultimate insiders.

Pop-Ups and Pickles

Pop-Ups and Pickles

An exlporation of Little Italy and Brooklyn.

The Keys to the City

The Keys to the City

Art, restaurants, and nightlife in New York City.

Social Climbing

Social Climbing

Unexpected recreational activities in Brooklyn.

Earth and Water

Earth and Water

Discover NYC by land and by sail.

Insider Profiles

Space for Hire: Mastering the Pop-Up

Alan Philips"The seven or eight hundred people who come to this pop-up restaurant are the only people who will ever be able to say they experienced that. And in New York that's super exciting."


New Yorkers can be tough to please. But Alan Philips makes it his business to stay ahead of the trends in nightlife and entertainment. His SKY Group advises some of the big names in hotels, casinos, restaurants and nightclubs, helping them to drive savvy and sophisticated fun-seekers through their doors. He also writes a blog, "Cocktail Hour," targeting young, urban foodies, along with his industry counterparts. Now he's engaged in an exciting new dining concept: the pop-up restaurant.

re:discover: So how does this work?

Alan Philips: We're in the midst of a pop-up right now, which has been mayhem. We're in day two, which is our last night. Grand opening, grand closing. This one is at the Hotel on Rivington. We took over their restaurant. We redesigned it. We basically reconstructed it. Now it is a Roaring '20s speakeasy and steakhouse.

What fun is that!

It has been great. We never expected people to show up in costume. I'd say 60 or 70 percent of the people are showing up in costume. It's awesome.

How are they finding out about it?

We have a partnership with Gilt Groupe. So they are part of the sales team. Then we have a website, thepopuprestaurant.com. We have about 5,000 members to that website who are specifically looking to participate in these types of events. We also have about 15,000 people on our general mailing list.

When did you start doing this?

I've been doing events for 12 years. But my first pop-up restaurant didn't open until May. This is the third one, and we have eight more in the planning stages. So now they'll start rolling out nationwide.

What gave you the idea for pop-up restaurants?

I have a real passion for entertaining. I like to have people over, whether it's to my house or my family's house. Wherever it is, I like to cook and share my passion for food and wine with people. So that passion really translated into this idea of, originally, a roving dinner party. And then with the hotness of the pop-up concept, the idea of a pop-up restaurant seemed like something the market would really react to and something I had to take advantage of.

So what about when they close? All that hard work!

It's depressing. You're just getting up and running. You're just getting your feet under you. To be honest, the first night of a regular restaurant they might be at 50 percent capacity. We're at, like, 120 percent capacity. So by the time you work out all the kinks, you're closed. … But the fact that we are able to do this, it really creates a special experience that only a small group of people can share. And so the seven or eight hundred people who come to this pop-up restaurant are the only people who will ever be able to say they experienced that. And in New York that's super exciting because everyone in New York wants to tell everyone else they got to see something [that others] didn't get to see.

Check out Alan's New York.